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Issue 32 – June 2011

How we access information is evolving, and evolving fast. Mobile and smart digital content is now presented and accessed in ways that we wouldn’t have dreamed possible just a few years ago.

In this issue of Editors’ Update, we explore some of Elsevier’s latest introductions to meet this evolving demand. Article of the Future is shaping the way the author and reader experience an online article while SciVerse Applications and Elsevier’s Developer Network collaborate together to pave the way for the development of research-enhancing applications.

Innovation is the driving force behind our marketing communications teams and in From Print to Digital they explain some of the latest developments in their journal marketing strategy. We also discuss the increase in access to online information – and the advantages that offers – in Studious Researchers Reap the Rewards, while A Helping Hand for Early Career Reviewers outlines some of the training opportunities available to increase reviewer experience.

In line with these exciting new advancements, I hope you will enjoy the developments we have made to Editors’ Update. We invite you to:

  • Interact with other journal editors by sharing your comments on the articles you read
  • Find out what others have to say on a broad range of topics in Editor in the Spotlight
  • Discover the Editors’ Update Webinar Program and access the archive
  • Vote on subjects of interest in our regular polls and more…

We consider this the first step on the path to providing a comprehensive online resource for Elsevier journal editors and value your input to ensure that future innovations remain in line with your needs. Please take a moment to fill in the feedback form on the Contact us page.

I hope you enjoy reading this issue.

Hannah Foreman
Academic Relations Manager, Elsevier

Articles

Helping Hand for Early Career Reviewers

A Helping Hand for Early Career Reviewers

“A real-life, hands-on approach like this equips future reviewers like never before.” — Irene Kanter-Schlifke, Publisher In many areas of research, the growth of paper submissions is outpacing the growth of qualified reviewers and resulting in pressure on the peer review system. As an editor, you will be only too aware of the challenge of […]

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"A real-life, hands-on approach like this equips future reviewers like never before." — Irene Kanter-Schlifke, Publisher

In many areas of research, the growth of paper submissions is outpacing the growth of qualified reviewers and resulting in pressure on the peer review system. As an editor, you will be only too aware of the challenge of finding good reviewers. Together with our editorial community, journal publishers at Elsevier have been working on a number of programs to develop and nurture your future pool of reviewers.

Reviewer Guidelines

Following a request from reviewers for increased support and guidance, and tests by current journal editors, the Reviewer Guidelines are now available on all Elsevier journal homepages and on our Reviewers’ homepage.

A step-by-step guide through the various stages of the peer-review process, the guidelines begin with the ‘purpose of peer review’ (addressing why reviewers should review); move on to conducting the review itself (what criteria should the reviewer be taking into account); and finish with submitting the report to the editor. They include key topics relevant to peer review, such as conducting the review, originality of research, the structure of a paper and ethical issues, together with a sample peer review report.

Reviewer Workshops – the next step

Reviewer Workshops allow participants to put the Reviewer Guidelines into context. “They aim to promote and explain the fundamentals and techniques that reviewers should adhere to when reviewing manuscripts for academic journals,” explains Andrea Hoogenkamp-O’Brien, Customer Communications Manager. Such workshops have been taking place across China, together with input from some Elsevier journal editors giving young Chinese scientists the opportunity to review scientific papers for international journals and to get hands-on training.

Reviewer Workshops held in China
Reviewer Workshops held in China

During a workshop, reviewers receive practical information on Elsevier publishing policies and procedures together with advice from other reviewers and editors, all with the aim to expedite the process of reviewing papers. Throughout the sessions, there is thorough discussion of the philosophy of peer review, various steps of the review process and examples from recent journals.

“The result is that reviewers get a real opportunity to better understand the principles and methods involved in reviewing for an international journal,” notes Hoogenkamp-O’Brien. "This is invaluable experience for the next step in our program."

Reviewer Mentorship Program

This program aims to extend the help given to reviewers during workshops by also giving some coaching and direct feedback on the reports that the trainees have submitted. Elsevier Publisher Irene Kanter-Schlifke has been piloting this program in two Institutions; Lille University, France, and the Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany. Each program involved 10-12 trainees.

The Reviewer Mentorship Program consists of two parts:

  • Part one – organization of the workshop itself at an institute or university. The journal publisher works together with an editor who is affiliated to the institute or university.
  • Part two – the setting up of a support EES site (our online submission, peer-review and editorial system) which is populated with original manuscripts selected by the editor. This is due to go live shortly.

Before the workshop, trainees must:

  • review an original manuscript;
  • complete the journal’s reviewer checklist; and
  • submit their report to the workshop tutors (the publisher and the editor).

“It is important that the trainees review a manuscript that is both controversial and in their area of expertise. During the workshop, an introduction on reviewing is given, followed by a discussion of the review and disclosure of  the original ‘fate’ of the paper (reviews and the final article, if accepted for publication). A real-life, hands-on approach like this equips future reviewers like never before,” explains Kanter-Schlifke.

After the workshop, trainees are invited through the system to review at least two manuscripts within a given timeframe. Each trainee is supported by a mentor who discusses the reviews with the trainee and gives feedback and guidance. The mentor finally decides when a trainee has gained enough experience to review live manuscripts. After the program, each trainee receives a certificate of participation from Elsevier.

“There are a few thoughts on what defines a good reviewer,” adds Hoogenkamp-O’Brien. “The definition I particularly like is: A good reviewer should know the journal and should have the knowledge to be able to fairly and objectively give a good report of the manuscript they are reviewing. They should concentrate on offering useful advice to authors rather than giving summary reports to editors.”

If you are interested in running either a Reviewer Workshop or Reviewer Mentorship Program at your institute or would like some further information, please email Editors' Update.

We want to hear your views on these and other issues surrounding the challenges faced by editors and peer review. Please share your thoughts by posting a comment at the bottom of this page.

View a videocast of a Reviewer Workshop in China

Author Biographies

Irene Kanter-Schlifke

Irene Kanter-Schlifke
PUBLISHER
In 2008, Irene began work as a Publisher for Elsevier’s Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences portfolio of journals. In her current role as publisher, she has been working on a number of exciting initiatives with her editors and colleagues, one of which is helping to organize and run a mentorship program for new reviewers. She holds a PhD in Neurology from Wallenberg Neuroscience Centre, in Lund, Sweden.   Before coming to Elsevier, she worked at Centocor (now Janssen Biologics), part of Johnson & Johnson pharmaceuticals in The Netherlands.

Andrea Hoogenkamp-O'Brien

Andrea Hoogenkamp-O'Brien

Andrea Hoogenkamp-O'Brien
CUSTOMER COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER
Andrea has recently started working in the Strategy and Journal Services department of Elsevier in Amsterdam, where she is part of a team responsible for developing new initiatives to improve services for authors, editors and reviewers. She joins Elsevier from FEMS in Delft where she had worked as the Editorial Coordinator, responsible for managing the publications unit, which publishes five FEMS Microbiology journals. Prior to that, Andrea held the position of Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Amsterdam.


Related Articles

Studious Researchers Reap the Rewards

Studious Researchers Reap the Rewards

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go”. – Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut! Long gone are the days when scholars could read all the journals in their field and feel like they were up to date. As early […]

Read more >


"The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you'll go". - Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!

Long gone are the days when scholars could read all the journals in their field and feel like they were up to date. As early as 1826, the publication deluge led Michael Faraday to remark: “It is certainly impossible for any person who wishes to devote a portion of his time to chemical experiment, to read all the books and papers that are published.” He believed the challenge of finding publications of interest among the mountain available led people to, “pass by what is really good”.

Today there are more than 2,000 scientific, technical and medical publishers responsible for more than 27,000 active, peer-reviewed scholarly journals, containing more than 1.5 million peer-reviewed articles per year.  And because readers have unprecedented access to a large proportion of these articles online, does that mean they are able to read all those that are of interest?  And if they are spending so much time reading, how can they have time to do research, not to mention write their own papers?

Several recent studies have shown that readers of journal articles are managing quite well.  And, as suggested by Dr. Seuss, the more they read, the more they know, and the better they are at producing articles and receiving funding (Seuss suggests reading increases researcher mobility.  This, however, has not yet been assessed).  Researchers now read from 25%+ more journals and the number of articles read per year has increased by 15%.  Productivity (time spent analyzing versus gathering data) has increased by 4%[1].

Research Information Network (RIN) in the UK has delved further into reading behavior and the question of productivity.  In Phase One of their e-journal study (2009), they examined whether enhanced access to journal articles has led to greater productivity, research quality and other outcomes.  They found that the use of journal articles more than doubled between 2004 and 2008[2].  At Russell Group universities (the 20 leading research-intensive universities in the UK), usage tripled.  Andrew Plume, Associate Director of Scientometrics & Market Analysis at Elsevier, adds: “Downloads of journal articles are increasing faster than the worldwide growth in the number of articles published each year. Readers are citing more, and from more varied sources.  This suggests that they are finding and using a growing proportion of the worldwide scholarly literature.”

Researchers at different institutions have different searching behavior

The RIN studies showed that users in the most research-intensive universities behave differently from those in less research-intensive ones:

  • They view and download more articles per capita
  • They spend much less time on each visit
  • They do not use many of the online facilities, like search engines and alerts, provided on the publishers’ platforms
  • They are much more likely to enter via gateway sites such as Google or PubMed.

Researchers have different reading styles[3]

Not surprisingly, as they move through the academic system, researchers read more.  Only 2.6% of students reported that they read journal articles every day, while 36.8% of PhD students and 45.3% of researchers reported daily use[3]. Even at the researcher level, their approach to reading differs, with some reading the entire article once and others concentrating on article sections.

Self-reported article reading behavior

Does the fact they are sourcing and reading more articles translate into increased productivity?  Assessing the period 2004-2008, RIN found a strong correlation between the number of articles viewed and the number of articles published.  The group also discovered a correlation between reading behavior, publications, PhDs granted and grant income[3].  This is supported by Carol Tenopir’s study[4] which shows that electronic journals play a vital role in all aspects of grants, from proposal writing to final reports.

“It’s clear that e-journals have given researchers an unprecedented level and convenience of access to knowledge in scholarly articles, but what effect have they had on the ways in which researchers seek information? Do they provide good value for money to higher education libraries and what are the wider benefits to universities and research institutions?” asks Plume.

Usage of e-journals relationships

Phase Two of the RIN study, released in January 2011, pursued this further.  It showed three strong correlations:

  • Expenditure on journal content drives use.  The reverse hypothesis, that use drives subsequent levels of library spending, is not correlated.
  • The use of e-journals (i.e. reading) drives subsequent research success (as defined by numbers of papers published, citation impact, numbers of PhD awards, and research grants and contract income).
  • Research success drives more usage of e-journals.

“All this is good news for journal editors,” explains Plume.  “They can be assured that their journal’s best articles are doing more than inspiring ideas.  They are increasing publications, citations, PhDs awarded and research income.”

Plume continues: “It’s good news for libraries too. Library expenditure on e-journals remains only 0.5% of total university spending.  At the same time, studies like these show their vital role as information providers.  By showing the return on investment they provide to the universities, they become important stakeholders in the university’s and reader’s success.”

“And will you succeed? Yes! You will indeed! (98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed).” — Dr. Seuss

What do you think? You can share your views by posting a comment at the bottom of this page.

[1] Source: Outsell Hot Topics, vol 1, May 6, 2005: “2001 vs 2005, Research study reveals dramatic changes among information consumers”; and Dr Carol Tenopir, "Discovering the Magic: Faculty and Student Use of Electronic Journals"
[2] Source: E-journals, their use value and impact, January 2011. Research Information Network
[3] Source: E-journals, their use value and impact, April 2009. Research Information Network
[4] Source: Elsevier Connect White Paper: University Investment in the Library, Phase II: An International Study of the Library's Value to the Grants Process 2010 by Carol Tenopir et al.

Author Biography

Noelle Gracy

Noelle Gracy

Noelle Gracy
REGIONAL MARKETING MANAGER, N. EUROPE AND LATIN AMERICA
Noelle Gracy received her PhD in Neuroscience from Cornell University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, New York, and completed her postdoc training at The Scripps Research Institute in California. She moved to scientific publishing at Academic Press in 1999, at the beginning of the transition to online publishing. She handled the biochemistry, and later genetics, journal portfolios as Executive Publisher until 2009.

From Print to Digital

From Print to Digital

“…we really want potential authors to see what we can now do for them in the digital environment with all that means for enhancing, and building functionality around, the article.” — David Clark, Senior Vice President, Physical Sciences As a continuation of the discussion raised in the March 2010 issue of Editors’ Update, concerning the […]

Read more >


"...we really want potential authors to see what we can now do for them in the digital environment with all that means for enhancing, and building functionality around, the article.” — David Clark, Senior Vice President, Physical Sciences

As a continuation of the discussion raised in the March 2010 issue of Editors’ Update, concerning the trend from print marketing activities to online journal marketing, we would like to update you on recent developments. As Elsevier publishes more than 95% of its information online, and with the increasing use of smart content and APIs, the move from print publishing to digital dissemination is firmly rooted within the research community.

It is therefore a logical step for Elsevier to reflect this trend across all areas of the scientific publishing process. In the Marketing Communications team for Science and Technology (S&T) journals, a decision to focus on marketing journal content digitally has led to the removal of print sample copies at exhibitions. Instead, this team is channeling its efforts into improving journal visibility through online methods.

Stepping into a new era

“We have developed many online features to enhance our digital marketing campaigns such as CiteAlert, and community-wide announcements on publication speeds and Impact Factor results,” explains Nicoline van der Linden, Vice President Marketing Communications. “We have been using RSS feeds for some time now and recently we have been strengthening our presence on research and scientific blogs; social media channels; search engine optimization and search engine marketing to make our journals even more visible than in the print era.”

The first issue of a journal published each year continues to be freely accessible via SciVerse ScienceDirect. At exhibitions where Elsevier is present, laptops or iPads are used to demonstrate this feature to potential and existing authors. Visitors are also shown how online articles can be ordered directly from the exhibition booth and sent via SciVerse ScienceDirect. “Many visitors make use of this digital and environmentally-friendly service,” notes van der Linden.

More recently, developments in technology such as smart phones and iPads have enabled Elsevier to experiment in the field of mobile applications. The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) launched the JACC iPad edition at the end of 2010, offering everything researchers had come to expect from their weekly issue, but enhanced with editor-selected resources from CardioSource and other integrated features. Elsevier’s Personal Selections application allows researchers to keep up-to-date by accessing the latest 25 articles (abstracts and full texts) based on their selection of keywords.  “These and other developments confirm how Elsevier is committed to continually serving the research community innovatively,” adds van der Linden.

Exceptions to the rule

According to David Clark, Senior Vice President Physical Sciences, “while there may be times when having a specific journal issue at a meeting can be useful, we really want potential authors to see what we can now do for them in the digital environment with all that means for enhancing, and building functionality around, the article”.

The author of the future

There seems to be little disputing that addressing authors’ needs, both current and future, remains a challenge that all STM publishers face. Embracing and enhancing new trends, though at times experimental, can lead to breakthroughs in how we connect with the author of tomorrow. As an editor there are a number of ways we can work together with you on your journal to ensure it remains at the forefront of your community. Your marketing communications manager or publishing contact can inform you further of the marketing plan in place for your journal.

We want to hear your thoughts

  1. What techniques do you already use to digitally promote your journal within the community?
  2. Are you active in scientific or research blogs? If so, which ones?
  3. Do you use social media in your role as a journal editor?

Please take a few moments to post your comments.

Author Biographies

Nicoline van der Linden

Nicoline van der Linden

Nicoline van der Linden
VICE PRESIDENT MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
Nicoline oversees the marketing efforts for our S&T journals and scientific conferences. She started her career as a Molecular Biologist, followed by various publishing and management positions at Elsevier where she handled a variety of portfolios in Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Engineering. Nicoline was educated at the Universities of Amsterdam and Basel, as well as the Rotterdam School of Management.

David Clark

David Clark

David Clark
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT PHYSICAL SCIENCES
David oversees our program in physics, mathematics, computer science and materials which includes both some of the newest and longest-standing Elsevier journal titles. Previously he was a publishing director for physics and mathematics, publishing director for economics and a publisher for economics and for geography. David was educated at Oxford and London Universities.

Related Articles:

sciverse

Collaboration Proves Key to Innovative Developments

“Applications are the new form of publications on the web.” — Vishal Gupta, Director, Developer Network The launch of the SciVerse platform in 2010 provided a forward-driven and collaborative scientific community with access to the world’s largest source of peer-reviewed content. SciVerse holds an abstract and citation database containing 41 million records – 70% with […]

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“Applications are the new form of publications on the web." — Vishal Gupta, Director, Developer Network

The launch of the SciVerse platform in 2010 provided a forward-driven and collaborative scientific community with access to the world’s largest source of peer-reviewed content. SciVerse holds an abstract and citation database containing 41 million records - 70% with abstracts - and nearly 18,000 titles from 5,000 publishers worldwide.

In November 2010, Elsevier expanded the service offered by the platform with the addition of SciVerse Applications, a gallery offering a new way of sharing knowledge, insight and improvement in workflows; all supported by steady input and feedback from the global research and developer community engaged through the Developer Network.

Jay Katzen, MD of A&G Markets, explains: “We spent a significant amount of time doing research with librarians and researchers across all segments including academic, government, corporate and health science.”

Referring to the new developments on SciVerse he adds: “Our goal is to foster the creation of a new type of community to collaborate and drive innovation, much like you see with Apple, Facebook, Google and others.”

Trusted Partnerships

By opening up its content, Elsevier’s Developer Network is leading the way for engaging experts from all subject areas to develop applications using available APIs (Application Programming Interfaces). The flourishing of this new scientific knowledge ecosystem, a concept brought to the public by Rafael Sidi (VP, Application Marketplace and Developer Network), was preceded by a number of trends: a call for openness and interoperability, personalization of information and an increasing need for trusted collaboration.

“As researchers become increasingly bogged down by information overload, creating tools to help them is crucial." — Michelle Lee, Director of Product Management, SciVerse Applications

Apps are being created to increase collaboration between researchers such as the Co-Author Visualizer, Prolific Authors, and Expert Search etc. On a broader scale, partnerships have become significant in the development of apps.

Vishal Gupta (Director, Developer Network) points to the venture between the US’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Elsevier: “This resulted in the launch of the Data.gov app and illustrates how researchers, government and web scientists are accessing scholarly content and linking this with government datasets to provide a richer experience to the end users in their scientific research.”

Some of the SciVerse applications now available

Another example is the Reflect-Network application, integrated within the life sciences journals on SciVerse Science Direct via Reflect, a tool that tags proteins and chemicals in a document. It addresses the workflow challenges of life sciences researchers by helping them quickly understand and visualize the content of an article. The application was developed in partnership with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Germany, and the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research (CPR), University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

More than 3,000 interviews with librarians, information specialists and researchers have been conducted in a long preamble leading up to the emergence of SciVerse Applications and the Developer Network.  As Katzen remarks: “This is a way that developers can work with researchers, or researchers can become developers themselves and customize or make applications based on article content, author data, affiliation data, and abstracts…to really deliver more value for the end user.”

The necessity of collaboration is not new in research. It is deeply ingrained in the authoring and peer-review process. “Applications too need to be reviewed.  Product managers in the SciVerse Applications team spend considerable time engaging and supporting developers to review and ensure high quality apps.  In addition, users will also be able to review and provide direct feedback to the developer,” says Michelle Lee, Director of Product Management, SciVerse Applications.

Gupta takes this a step further: “Applications are the new form of publications on the web. They can provide additional insights to the researcher and can be accompanied by an applications note that can be further published in the traditional way. The use of the applications in the context of the underlying content will also enrich the value of the journal content, which in turn will help increase the journal usage and make it the ‘destination of choice’.”

Centered on categories such as collaboration, search, management (of information) and analysis (of information), applications will slowly pervade a researcher’s career. Supporting multidisciplinary research, applying ontology and semantic driven searches, bringing the exploration of numerous datasets to manageable proportions and offering valuable insight into author networks are a few examples of the significance of SciVerse Applications for research communities.

Increasing content value

Lee elaborates: “As researchers become increasingly bogged down by information overload, creating tools to help them is crucial. These could be simple apps, like the eReader Formats app that allows a researcher to download a PDF and put it on his iPad. Or they can be highly analytical apps like quantiFind that extract and aggregate data from our corpus and visualize that to illustrate trends. SciVerse Applications enables a radically different approach to how our customers and end users approach our content."

Author Biography

Gwendolyn-Holstege

Gwendolyn Holstege

Gwendolyn Holstege
PUBLISHING ENABLEMENT MANAGER
Gwendolyn has recently started work for the Media and Communities team of the A&G Markets department of Elsevier in Amsterdam. She is responsible for keeping the needs of authors, editors and reviewers top of mind when these relate to the online solutions Elsevier offers like SciVerse (ScienceDirect, Scopus, Applications ) and SciVal  (Spotlight, Funding, Strata). Prior to that, she worked in a number of different roles for A&G Markets. Gwen holds an MA from the University of Amsterdam.

Related Articles

Article of the Future

Have you seen the Article of the Future?

“…it is not a project with a deadline, it is our never-ending quest to explore better ways to deliver the formal published record.” — IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg, Vice President Content Innovation, S&T Journals With the rapid advance of new technology, publishers have been required to think creatively about the way they provide communications to the scientific […]

Read more >


“...it is not a project with a deadline, it is our never-ending quest to explore better ways to deliver the formal published record." — IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg, Vice President Content Innovation, S&T Journals

With the rapid advance of new technology, publishers have been required to think creatively about the way they provide communications to the scientific community.

But while the transition from print to online has been relatively smooth, the content of scientific articles, and the way they are presented, still follows a tried and tested formula laid down almost 350 years ago.

According to Marie Sheehan, Head of Communications for Innovation and Product Development, S&T Journals, this is a missed opportunity, and one that Elsevier is keen to address with its innovative ‘Article of the Future’ project.

The project aims to break away from the traditional ‘abstract, findings, conclusion, references’ format, and to radically transform the ‘reader experience’. The latest milestone in this ongoing project is the introduction of the ‘three-pane’ version of the article, prototypes of which will be unveiled in June this year at www.articleofthefuture.com.

An Article of the Future prototype in the field of Electro-Chemistry

While the prototypes featured on the website relate to seven specific scientific disciplines, the concept will apply to all journals and visitors will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the new content and layout, before being invited to take part in a short online survey.

Sheehan says: “We really hope people will take the time to let us know what they think – we want to collect input from a broad range of disciplines to ensure we are meeting authors’ and editors’ needs, and to address those in future releases.”

Commenting on the project, Sheehan adds: “The first thing to make clear is that this is not a new Elsevier product, it is not a ‘thing’. Article of the Future is a process, a journey we are on to change the scientific article with regard to three key areas: content, context and presentation."

IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg, Vice President Content Innovation, S&T Journals, explains: “As an author you want your work to be propelled, you want it to receive maximum exposure. And the more value your paper offers, the more it is seen, the more it is cited and that has a knock-on effect not only for the author, but also for the journal and the editorial board, as well as for the author’s institute.

“With Article of the Future we want to provide the best possible place to expose and explore research. But it is not a project with a deadline, it is our never-ending quest to explore better ways to deliver the formal published record. It is an ongoing journey with milestones, collaborations, results and ideas.”

One of those collaborations has taken the form of a partnership with 150 researchers from a range of disciplines who have been consulted each step of the way during the project’s process, via user interviews, behavior studies and tests. Together with Elsevier, they have focused on three main areas: content, context, and presentation.

Content

Authors can now add their own discipline-specific and rich content such as interactive plots, chemical compounds, or interactive maps. Furthermore, new possibilities such as graphical abstracts and research highlights will enable users to more efficiently skim articles.

Context

The context element offers authors opportunities to add a range of valuable connections to the published article, for example related research data sets, author information and research groups. Commonly used entities in the article can also be tagged and linked to databases, e.g. Genbank and Protein Data Bank, and context can also be pulled from these databases into the articles.

While many of the new content and context features will apply to all journals, others will be domain-specific.

Sheehan explains: “For example, Google maps (an application that enriches an article with research data visualized on an interactive map) has already been added to earth sciences, life sciences and social sciences journals and can be rolled out to other journals as needed.”

Presentation

Presentation looks at the ‘readability’ of the article and aims to surpass the current HTML and traditional PDF with new content elements and better navigation.

Sheehan says: “One clear message we received during the partnership process was that researchers do want all the domain-specific bells and whistles that technology can add to a scientific paper, but they also want to simply focus on the message in that paper, which led us to a very clean reading pane in the middle of the three-pane view.”

The left pane will contain navigation options enabling quicker exploration of the article, while the right pane will allow for new article content elements and context exploration beyond the paper.

An Article of the Future prototype in the field of Parasitology and Tropical Diseases

Aalbersberg adds: “As the three-pane design separates navigation and extensions from the core article, it minimizes distraction and unobtrusively and intuitively connects the clean reading with the new content and context.”

Rollout

As with many findings uncovered by the Article of the Future project, the three-pane view will be released on SciVerse ScienceDirect. Please take a few moments to view the prototypes at www.articleofthefuture.com and complete the short online questionnaire.

Have you seen the Article of the Future? If so, we'd love to hear your views via our comment function at the bottom of this page.

Author Biography

Marie Sheehan

Marie Sheehan

Marie Sheehan
HEAD OF COMMUNICATIONS
Marie is Head of Communications for the Innovation and Product Development department in Elsevier’s S&T Journals division. Since joining Elsevier in 2002, she has held various marketing and communications positions in the publishing organization.

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http://editorsupdate.elsevier.com//wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Editorsupdate_32.pdf

In the future, will authors have only a few mega journals to choose from when submitting their manuscripts?

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Webinars & webcasts

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Learn more about our growing library of useful bite-sized webcasts covering a range of subjects relevant to your work as an editor, including ethics, peer review and bibliometrics.